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Old 02-20-2011, 10:33 PM   #1
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Dana White: "the father of mixed martial arts was Bruce Lee."

From Dana White and the future of UFC

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"It's a little tough for the traditional martial artists to swallow, because one system doesn't do it. You've got to cross-train in many different systems. Actually, the father of mixed martial arts, if you will, was Bruce Lee. If you look at the way Bruce Lee trained, the way he fought, and many of the things he wrote, he said the perfect style was no style. You take a little something from everything. You take the good things from every different discipline, use what works, and you throw the rest away."
From "Unsettled Matters"

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While living in Seattle, Bruce spent considerable time perusing the bookstores in Seattle’s Chinatown and traveling to Canada in search of texts on the martial arts. Within a year he had amassed an impressive library on the vast spectrum of eastern fighting arts. Following an exhaustive study, however, Bruce concluded that there were no real masters, and he took it as a personal insult. Many individuals who were close to Bruce throughout his life felt that his early obsessive search for what he perceived as a true martial arts master was fueled by his unfulfilled relationship with his father.

It was around this time, in the early 1960s, that Bruce began what would become a lifelong quest to form his own system of martial art. Leaving no stone unturned, he extended his study into the fields of wrestling, boxing, savate, karate and fencing, to list the most prominent.
Watch this, 34 min. in it MMA fighters and trainers discuss Bruce Lee's influence on MMA.
How Bruce Lee Changed the World - History Channel


Last edited by antagony**; 02-25-2011 at 01:03 AM.
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Old 02-20-2011, 10:35 PM   #2
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Old 02-20-2011, 10:35 PM   #3
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Dana white with his pearls of wisdom.

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:37 PM   #4
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This is a really good excerpt from a documentary. There is some sick sparring at 9:45 and on where you can see how fast Bruce intercepts all of his opponent's offensive moves. Very impressive...



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Shortly after Bruce arrived in Seattle, he began training with a man named Fook Young, an instructor at the Chinese Youth Club. In exchange for Wing Chun lessons, Young taught Bruce a form called Jeet Kune and a variety of styles, including Pak-Kua and the Preying Mantis. Supplemental to this training with Young, Bruce also began studying judo under the United States national champion Shuzo Kato, and trained in the Choy Li Fut school of kung fu with Richard Leong.

While living in Seattle, Bruce spent considerable time perusing the bookstores in Seattle’s Chinatown and traveling to Canada in search of texts on the martial arts. Within a year he had amassed an impressive library on the vast spectrum of eastern fighting arts. Following an exhaustive study, however, Bruce concluded that there were no real masters, and he took it as a personal insult. Many individuals who were close to Bruce throughout his life felt that his early obsessive search for what he perceived as a true martial arts master was fueled by his unfulfilled relationship with his father.
It was around this time, in the early 1960s, that Bruce began what would become a lifelong quest to form his own system of martial art. Leaving no stone unturned, he extended his study into the fields of wrestling, boxing, savate, karate and fencing, to list the most prominent.
In his book Unlimited Power, Anthony Robbins states: “The movers and shakers of the world are often professional modelers—people who have mastered the art of learning everything they can by following other people’s experience rather than their own.” And further: “To model excellence, you should become a detective, an investigator, someone who asks lots of questions and tracks down all the clues to what produces excellence.” Throughout his life, one of Bruce Lee’s greatest assets was that he fully understood this principle.

Fundamentally there was really no great mystery to much of Bruce’s talent. As a foundation he was an incredible natural athlete, “one in two billion,” to quote Ed Parker, and he kept himself in superb physical condition, which he worked at to the point of clinical obsession.
Additionally, as for unrestricted open combat, he had simplified his art and perfected several key elements that often proved to be devastating.
From the great fencing master Julio Martinez Castello, Bruce mastered the ability of opening and closing the gap, or distance, between him and his opponent, to the degree that he could strike with the speed of a cobra. Second, Bruce also mastered what Castello taught as “broken-rhythm,” which is one’s ability to become enmeshed with, and thereby disrupt, his opponent’s natural rhythm. Once perfected, a man normally slower than his opponent can win by striking his adversary on the half and quarter beats. The total effect was both highly confusing and monumentally frustrating.
Moreover, Bruce had become so skilled in the art of western boxing that many were convinced that he could have stepped into the ring with any professional boxer in his own weight division and most likely the next higher division as well. When Bruce closed the gap, most martial artists were often completely dumbfounded because they were not accustomed to teeing up with a boxer of Bruce’s professional skill.
Similarly, Bruce was equally dangerous at a distance, for he could kick his opponent from had to toe with the blinding speed of a bullwhip and, quite literally, with the power of a horse. Moreover, he had perfected the art of kicking his opponent’s front shin as speedily and effectively as a boxer uses a jab. Not only was this unnervingly distracting, but it severely hampered his opponent’s interest in either kicking his own front leg or advancing.
Unquestionably Bruce’s greatest asset was that he was a mater at instantly discerning his opponent’s weaknesses. A short time after Bruce moved to Los Angeles, he began recruiting students from the ranks of Ed Parker’s brown and black belt classes. The growing exodus of Parker’s advanced students did not sit well with the godfather of kenpo.

Bruce readily identified the inherent problem that flustered many of Parker’s advanced kenpo students. Essentially the problem was threefold. The first issue facing the kenpo practitioner was that the lion’s share of his learned techniques were defenses against an opponent who attacked by stepping through with his right leg from back to front as he delivered a locked out straight right punch. The problem, which Bruce smugly pointed out, was that no streetfighter he ever encountered fought like this. The second issue was that Bruce refused to stand still while a kenpoist worked on him as if he were a stationary mannequin. Instead he was quick and elusive. Lastly, kenpo students were primarily trained to move to the outside of an attacking opponent. Because one of Bruce’s main objectives was always to control the centerline (much like the winning chess player controls the center of the board, and the winning basketball team controls the lane) there just wasn’t any way to get Bruce Lee into this alignment because he would continuously maneuver himself in such a way that he was facing you head-on. In stark contrast, Bruce effortlessly, if not magically, could quickly get to the outside of his opponent where he then blasted away. That left the inside, toe-to-toe. Unfortunately for Lee’s opponent, this was where Bruce was at his best. Being a skilled technician of chi sao, or sticking hands, Bruce could handily defeat an opponent standing inside this range, and he could do it blindfolded!

In defense of the art of kenpo and its students, Ed Parker was a man of great insight. Over the years, many kenpo defectors have returned to resume their study, having discovered the truth of what Parker had been saying for years—that what worked for Bruce Lee was not only unique to Bruce but would have almost assuredly get most martial artists in serious trouble.


Last edited by antagony**; 02-22-2011 at 06:10 PM.
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Old 02-20-2011, 10:37 PM   #5
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Pankration.

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:38 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Ravden View Post
HAHA haven't seen that in a minute.

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:39 PM   #7
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agreed

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:41 PM   #8
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I can agree with that.

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:41 PM   #9
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Yeah I'm gonna say the father of mma was pankration or maybe Vale tudo

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Old 02-20-2011, 10:43 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by jrmy View Post
Yeah I'm gonna say the father of mma was pankration or maybe Vale tudo
I would agree, historically, but socially - Bruce had a worldwide influence which was more prominent, powerful, and noteworthy.

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