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Standup Technique Jab, right hook, left cross... is it really that hard? Talk about it here.

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Old 12-08-2013, 03:10 PM   #1
LawrenceKenshin

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Ernesto Hoost: The Perfect Low Kick

The legendary Ernesto Hoost was a four-time K-1 World Champion. To many, he's known as Mr. Perfect and Mr. Low Kick. Of course, consistent "perfection" doesn't exist in the combat world. But Ernesto Hoost was very consistent in many of his attacks, and this attack I'm about to highlight was truly very close to perfection.

The Highlight:

Let's take a moment to enjoy this low-kick highlight made by BKM.



Greg Jackson: A Law in Martial Arts

"The first law is everything in 2. If he blocks the rear leg kick then I hit him with the left. Or it switches to a front kick... Everything in 2s, there is no single move. As long as you follow the principles, you have a very good chance in winning." Link : Seminar at Evolve MMA.

The Left Hook into Low Kick:

Most mid-level strikers know this trick. By throwing the left-hook and landing it, it effectively shifts the opponents weight onto his lead leg. Since defending a kick is done by raising it (to "check" the kick), downward pressure from the hook creates an extra timeframe for the low-kick.



Another Gif


However, this technique won't be nearly as successful against experienced strikers, as it is a very common and understood concept.

Ernesto Hoost's Left Hook into Low Kick:



1. Jab entrance ; 2. Right hand checks the left hand ; 3. Left Hook ; 4. Low Kick

The same technique? : Left hook into low kick... What's so special about what Ernesto does? Why is the opponent raising his leg? Why are they so helpless and why do they "allow" Ernesto to get away with such committed attacks?

More Examples:

1 ; 2 ; 3 ; 4


As you can see, Ernesto Hoost is consistent. This isn't even a significant portion of the screen captures of the same thing happening over and over against his various elite opponents.

The Convincing Principle:

When you can convince you're opponent that your are throwing something else than what you're throwing, it's going to be a devastating attack. If you're opponent cannot prepare for an attack, his only option is to take it.

The Convincing Left Hook Transition:



Notice his upper body. Normally, a left-hook is thrown by transferring the weight forward and then back. Instead, when Hoost throws the left-hook, his body is more than half-way into the position of a right low-kick. This by effect, draws a check from his opponent (raising of the leg).

The Effect of the Left Hook:



Leaving his weight forward, Hoost takes a 45+ degree step to transition from the left hook to the low kick

When you throw a left-hook to someone who is standing on one foot, it's nearly impossible to keep the raised-leg up. The impact on the core will off-balance the opponent enough that they have no option but to step down. On it's way down, it becomes literally impossible to defend the low-kick.

A Closer Look at the Body Shot:



If the left-hook to the head isn't convincing enough to draw a check, then Hoost would often throw one to the body. On its way down, Hoost takes the 45 degree step and slams his entire bodyweight into his kick.

Level Change and Forward Scrunch:



Hoost's low-kicks are full commitment and full power. He swings his right arm down for extra momentum, and his left would often be in position to balance rather than to guard. But this doesn't mean that he doesn't have a defence built in, should his opponent miraculously find a timing to counter his near perfectly timed kick.

First off, he is positioned off the center-line.

And to add, since the best (power punch) counter to a right low-kick is a right-straight (straight down the pipe), Hoost does something that is again double purpose.

1. By scrunching down and forward, he is fully committed to the attack, and in doing so he multiplies the power of the kick.

2. Look at where his head is relative to his opponent's hand (highlighted by the blue line). If the opponent was able to fire off a right-straight, then it would hit the forehead.

The forehead is the hardest part of the head (it breaks hands) and it's common for skilled strikers to take a punch there as a last resort.

No Check:

Even if Hoost does not draw a check, his left-hook off balances his opponent enough for him to throw the kick. However, Hoost will always put full power to it and by doing so he also changes levels. In this particular case, he had his opponent thinking about a high-kick, and the opponent was left with a right hand without a straight target.

Examples:
1 2

Conclusion:

Let's look at some of the principles at play again.

Greg Jackson's law of effective techniques- everything ought to come a set of twos.

Set 1:

a) The left-hook is often followed by a low-kick. Since this is a common technique amongst strikers in practice, people have a natural inclination to raise the leg already.

b) Hoost also convinces the opponent with his upper body posture. His opponents think that the left-hook may be a low-kick lead.

Set 2:

a) If you don't raise the leg to check, the left-hook will off-balance the opponent or put his weight on the lead leg so it becomes difficult to check the kick.

b) If the opponent does raise the leg, the left-hook will make you drop it and the low-kick will be impossible to check.

Set 3:

a) By fully committing to the low-kick, the weight is pulled forward to multiply the power and the core is scrunched.

b) By doing so, the level is changed and the right hand straight counter will likely hit the forehead. Should an opponent choose to punch down, he will not generate optimal power due to the mechanic of the punch. One would need to also change levels to punch more effectively here.

Perfect doesn't exist in the combat world, but this is as close to perfection as it gets. Though this is just merely one technique of "Mr. Low Kick / Mr. Perfect", it demonstrates why people gave him this name.


Thank you for reading. I originally fan posted this on BE, but I thought I'd share with Sherdog as well. I hope you guys will enjoy it.

Video Analysis



Another on his kicking weight transfer (with better editing)


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Last edited by LawrenceKenshin; 12-22-2013 at 05:11 PM. Reason: embedding video analysis
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Old 12-08-2013, 03:42 PM   #2
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Really good thread.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:00 PM   #3
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So how is the opponent's weight shifted to the lead leg if you are shifting to the lead leg while throwing the hook and they don't take the bait and raise their leg?

I don't think it would be easy to hit hard enough to affect the change.

There is an awful lot to do on this forum about shifting your weight back to the back leg when throwing a lead hook. A lot of people naturally shift forward when throwing any lead hand strike in kick boxing. I always thought doing so made it easier to throw the rear kick.

It is like everything is correct so long as you know why you are doing it ;)

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:08 PM   #4
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Good idea posting it here, the standup forum always appreciates good work like this. I'm gonna copy and paste a comment I left on the original piece here, just to add to the discussion:

I think one of the biggest factor’s in Hoost’s ability to use that combination was his outstanding ability to double up on left hooks. He could throw two to the head or one to the head and one to the body which really disrupts timing and makes the combo very hard to defend. Especially since both the second left hook and the right low kick are loaded from the same position with the weight settled onto the lead hip. Even more so when the left to the body is thrown because the knees are already bent so he can just spring into that low kick. That double threat, his adaptability and his lightning speed made that combo overwhelmingly effective.

There are a lot of cool tricks in that short video. I’m a big fan of how Hoost would feint the right hand after the left hook but reach across the opponent’s face and pull them down into the leg kick instead of punching. That way even an opponent who was reacting correctly would be guided into a bad position. Plus, he was good at physically shoving people back then kicking their legs as they stumbled, and generally just kicking people in the leg as they try to retreat. Funny enough, I’ve found that that’s the biggest problem most boxers have when transitioning to kick-fighting. They learn to get past kicks and throw their punches, but it takes them a long time to learn to watch for kicks as they disengage.

Also incredible is his understanding of when to use different types of low kicks. Against opponents who are ready to check, he throws a more upward type of low kick that aims to come behind the knee and hit that weak area just below the hamstrings. Anyone who’s ever been kicked there knows it’s both incredibly painful and very good at taking the leg out from under you. When the opponent was in a bad position to check (such as when the leg was coming down as you mentioned) he would chop the kick down like an axe. Watching him kick is a lesson in power vs speed and when to use both.

A lot of Brazilians are very good at this concept. Barboza, Alves and Aldo of course. Most notably Aldo though, the similarities between some of his kicks and Hoost’s are remarkable.

I mean, here’s the upward kick I was just talking about:



And Here’s him using basically the exact same combo. Note how he also uses the right hand actively, pushing Hominick off balance and into range with it.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:22 PM   #5
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Good shit! Will read when I get home for sure. LOVE these kinda breakdowns. Try to learn as much as I can from it.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:31 PM   #6
LawrenceKenshin

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearse Shields View Post
Really good thread.
Thanks Pearse, glad you like it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SummerStriker View Post
So how is the opponent's weight shifted to the lead leg if you are shifting to the lead leg while throwing the hook and they don't take the bait and raise their leg?

I don't think it would be easy to hit hard enough to affect the change.

There is an awful lot to do on this forum about shifting your weight back to the back leg when throwing a lead hook. A lot of people naturally shift forward when throwing any lead hand strike in kick boxing. I always thought doing so made it easier to throw the rear kick.

It is like everything is correct so long as you know why you are doing it ;)
I'm a bit confused by your question, but if they don't raise the leg then the weight shift is still on his lead leg, (impact of a left hook transfers weight there automatically). Of course, the force matters in how much weight transfer there is, but it really depends on the two fighters and how they match against each other (e.g. their base/balance/power).

Some Nak Muays will be lead leg heavy to throw a rear kick really fast. A similar principle is used when you leave the weight forward in the left hook. Hope that answers your question!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tef0ak View Post
Good shit! Will read when I get home for sure. LOVE these kinda breakdowns. Try to learn as much as I can from it.
Hope you like it .

A Guy's post is excellent, really good detail and breakdown of some of the dozens of techniques we see in the Hoost highlight.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:34 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceKenshin View Post
A Guy's post is excellent, really good detail and breakdown of some of the dozens of techniques we see in the Hoost highlight.
I really should just tell you guys that my real name is James. I understand that calling me "a guy" has got to be annoying as shit haha, the name isn't half as clever as I originally thought.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SummerStriker View Post
So how is the opponent's weight shifted to the lead leg if you are shifting to the lead leg while throwing the hook and they don't take the bait and raise their leg?
You aren't shifting to the lead leg while throwing the hook, you're shifting there with the right hand THEN throwing the punch. The weight doesn't have to move all the way back for a left hook to have power, though shifting the weight back on the hook does make it powerful and gives you some natural head movement.

Quote:
I don't think it would be easy to hit hard enough to affect the change.
It's very easy. A very common defense to the left hook is to block with the right glove. However, it's not ideal to stand there and take it. You generally rotate your torso and shift the weight farther to the lead leg as part of the defense. Plus, any hit on the head can be used as a push to make the weight go where you want it. I know people always say not to push your punches, but this is one very good application for a pushed punch.

Quote:
There is an awful lot to do on this forum about shifting your weight back to the back leg when throwing a lead hook. A lot of people naturally shift forward when throwing any lead hand strike in kick boxing. I always thought doing so made it easier to throw the rear kick.

It is like everything is correct so long as you know why you are doing it ;)
You don't generally want the weight coming forward when throwing a lead hand strike, unless it's a jab. You can shift the weight forward before the punch and end with it still forward, but there is a very small shift of weight to the rear leg even when that type of punch is being thrown. I think this is what you're talking about, and yes it is much easier to throw a rear kick after that kind of hook. Just look at the gif of Aldo in my post, that's a running version of the technique. It's hard to see, but as he throws that hook his weight moves slightly to the right leg that he's stepping with, then he takes a small step with his left foot to get all the weight back there and line up the low kick.

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Old 12-08-2013, 04:56 PM   #9
LawrenceKenshin

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I really should just tell you guys that my real name is James. I understand that calling me "a guy" has got to be annoying as shit haha, the name isn't half as clever as I originally thought.
You know, I was actually about to make a comment about it in that reply. I think it's funny, but just a little awkward when trying to mention you. If I addressed you as James however, no one would know who I'm referring to haha. Including it in your signature could work~

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Old 12-08-2013, 05:15 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by LawrenceKenshin View Post
You know, I was actually about to make a comment about it in that reply. I think it's funny, but just a little awkward when trying to mention you. If I addressed you as James however, no one would know who I'm referring to haha. Including it in your signature could work~
Hm...not a bad idea. Don't wanna derail your thread any more though, carry on!

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